View unanswered posts | View active topics It is currently Thu Jan 18, 2018 9:45 pm



Reply to topic  [ 8 posts ] 
News articles about your costumes - how do you... 
Author Message
Site Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Sat May 08, 2010 2:52 pm
Posts: 702
Location: Brentwood, NY USA (Long Island)
Unread post News articles about your costumes - how do you...
...make sure the reporters get good photos of you (as opposed to the shot where you HAD to blow your nose)?
...handle a 'minor' but important-to-you inaccuracy in an otherwise positive article?
...let your parent fan group (501st/Rebel Legion, etc.) know that the article was published (and, slightly related, that you did not realize the nice reporter was a reporter)?

My experience is that I helped with a couple of panels at a convention, fielded tons of questions from everyone, and a couple of positive articles calling attention to local charity efforts were written.

BUT.

The photos used made me look like a donkey because I was laughing (I don't laugh pretty like some women do), Pam was not credited for my lekku (I mentioned FryGuy had made inexpensive lekku for his child by using tights and Plasti-Dip and apparently this was more interesting than "someone worked her butt off"), and I did not realize we had press at the panels. I also don't know if there's normally a procedure for this stuff and want to make sure I adhere to as much of it as I can when I let my base officers know.

_________________
"Slow is smooth; smooth is fast" -- shi-fu's mantra for learning and executing combat. It seems to apply to all things in my life except sleep.


Sat Apr 30, 2011 5:12 pm
Profile WWW
User avatar

Joined: Wed Mar 16, 2011 10:45 pm
Posts: 72
Unread post Re: News articles about your costumes - how do you...
I am interested in this!

I finally had my pic appear on the Star Wars blog photostream last December for the Clone Wars Savage Oppress screening... in my Clone Wars armored Jedi that was approved for the event... I was soooo excited!

And the pic that actually appears in the blog has me looking down to switch on the saber to get ready for the "official pic".... it looks like I'm slouching.... extremely UN-Jedi-like.

Gah! Almost wanted to quit costuming if I looked that awful....

I guess the moral of this story is.... never look down and never blow your nose. :roll:

So I am interested in this topic.


Sun May 01, 2011 12:39 am
Profile
Site Admin

Joined: Wed May 05, 2010 3:26 am
Posts: 423
Location: Central California
Unread post Re: News articles about your costumes - how do you...
Spotting the Press

When you're at a convention, there are often indicators that can tell you if the person taking your picture or asking you questions is a member of the press. Keep an eye out for a Press ribbon or sticker on their convention badge. They like to wear them, because it gets them better access to the con, and it helps people like us know who we're talking to. Another great indicator is the type of questions they ask. The average fans tend to ask things like, "How did you make that? What did you use?" They want to know how to make one for themselves. Members of the press tend to ask things like, "Why do you do this? How long have you been making costumes? Why do you like Star Trek?" The little clues add up, and sometimes you know without being told that you're being interviewed for the local paper. But, sometimes they sneak right past you, and you don't realize that they're press until the interview is over and they hand you a card, ask you to sign a waver, and/or you spot yourself in print somewhere. At least you usually don't have to worry about your interview showing up on TV without knowing first... when they shove that microphone in your face, it's a bit of a giveaway!

Interviews

99% of the time, interviewers are polite, honestly curious, and they're looking for good material for their article/show/etc. Some of them don't really know much about Star Wars, so they'll ask questions that feel silly to you, but you just roll with it and help them (and their audience) see what makes the genre and costuming so worthwhile. It's always good to have some ideas in mind for answering questions like, "What does your group do? Why do you enjoy costuming? What makes you like Star Wars?" Your exclamation about how great Jedi are will sound a lot more convincing if you don't have to go "Uhhhh..." before you answer! Be ready, because you never know when somebody will shove a microphone forward and offer you a fleeting moment of glory! We won't know what information or quotes they will select until we see the finished product, unfortunately. It's just the nature of the game.


Knowing When to Walk Away

There is also that other 1% of interviewers, and you should never be afraid to end an interview if you see things going downhill. Not all interviewers work for a newspaper or the local tv station. There are a growing number of folks who have their own video blogs or youtube channels, and not all of them are the kind of person we want to help. There have been times when Scott and I have stopped interviews and walked away when the interviewer (usually a 20-something guy with a handheld video camera) began asking crude or meanspirited questions. Be sure to end the interview politely, though. If you get rude or angry, you just gave them more negative ammunition to use on their show, and they'll most likely make fun of you for it. Sometimes they can surprise you, and you just have to deal with it. For example, Gene Simmons was really polite when he asked for an interview, and he was nice during the interview, but then he threw in a dirty comment at the very last moment, and there was nothing I could do about it. Oh, well, life goes on. Overall, my advice is to just make sure that you're comfortable when you're talking to the press, or anyone at a con or event for that matter. If things are going well, enjoy that time. If something makes you uncomfortable, excuse yourself and walk away.


Sharing With the Legions

Both the Rebel Legion and the 501st make use of Mission Reports to share photos, links, and general feedback on the events we attend. Reports aren't written for every event, unless there's somebody who is very gung-ho about writing them... but when there's something to share, always feel free to share it on the various forums. Folks enjoy seeing the successes that come with costuming! Reports can also be submitted to the 501st Cast or the Latest News on the 501st site, while the Rebel Legion has the Comlink Newsletter that goes out from time to time. Always feel free to share your news on the local forums, and with specialty groups like the Mercs and those silly Twi'lek people... those are the people who would enjoy hearing about it!


Photographs

This is one of those areas where it's usually luck of the draw. Just like the pictures on our own cameras, sometimes photographers catch us at a great moment, and sometimes they don't. There's no way for us to control when they'll take pictures, or which ones they decide to use. And even when they have some great pictures, the photograhpers tend to look at the overall composition of the pictures they decide to use, while we tend to focus on our expressions or the size of our muffintop at that particular angle. Sometimes we get lucky, we see ourselves in a paper or magazine and we do the happy giggle dance, singing "I'm so pretty, I'm so pretty!" Other times, we see ourselves in print and cry out a frantic, "Good lord, somebody put a paper bag over that, quick!" We often don't know if a photographer is taking "action" shots when we're busy talking to someone or giving a presentation. If they are, there's really not that much we can do about it. Often they do ask for a picture, so we have a chance to pose well for them and hope that that will be the picture they'll use. But really, even a six year old's pictures can end up online, on flikr or facebook, so the best thing to remember is to treat every photographer with the knowledge that the picture they take might end up in public view. Besides, everyone appreciates a costumer who is willing to take a moment to pose for them.

Honestly, I'm just as vain as anyone else... and I take pride in good pictures, and I grump over the bad ones. But as the years go by you realize that it's just a moment, and nobody else remembers the pictures or interviews, the good or the bad, longer than we do ourselves. Have fun with it, and roll with the ups and downs. Even the really embarrasing ones don't last long. At CIV I laughed at the wrong moment, and an API photographer with his big fancy camera caught me looking like a double-chinned, lumpy nosed, hee-hawing dork. (Amusingly, Scott caught a picture of him getting a picture of me.) The next thing I knew, that terrible picture had been published in four countries that I knew of, and probably more that I didn't. I wanted to crawl under the nearest table and hide. Now, though? Big deal. Few if any of those people knew me, and I can't even find the image anymore. It's old history now.


Image


Another warning: If someone asks for a picture, make sure to get ready before they push that button on their camera. If they start taking the picture while you're still busy talking to someone else, or if you haven't looked in their direction yet, you end up looking like guuh-huh... on facebook!

Image

(Obviously I've gotten past the "don't let them see how dorky I look" stage... I'll show everybody what a dork I am. :-D)


Interviews are scary but fun. It's pretty cool to see your costuming efforts being appreciated, or enshrined in print or film. Sometimes things will go well, sometimes they won't... but in the big picture, it's worth every moment!

Pam :-)

_________________
Image


Mon May 02, 2011 4:37 am
Profile
Site Admin

Joined: Wed May 05, 2010 3:58 am
Posts: 27
Unread post Re: News articles about your costumes - how do you...
Pam really covered these pretty well, but I guess I can toss in my own two cents from a Garrison CO perspective.

For your first question: Unless it's a scheduled interview / photoshoot, there really isn't anything you can do about making sure that the reporter uses a good photo. (Experience tells me that reporters will balk really hard at using a photo that they didn't have taken for that specific article.)

Second: really, if the error is minor and doesn't completely detract from the message of the interview, it's easiest to just let it go. If it does change the feeling of the message, and it's something that was printed (newspaper, etc..) it may be more hassle than it's worth to try to get it fixed.

Third one: Shoot a link of the published article over to your Garrison/Base CO and their PR person (if you have one.) Of course, that's only if you like the article. Otherwise, pretend it doesn't exist. There aren't any rules anywhere that say you can't do an interview with a reporter, or about how you have to go about letting folks know about it.

Nara Pel wrote:
...make sure the reporters get good photos of you (as opposed to the shot where you HAD to blow your nose)?
...handle a 'minor' but important-to-you inaccuracy in an otherwise positive article?
...let your parent fan group (501st/Rebel Legion, etc.) know that the article was published (and, slightly related, that you did not realize the nice reporter was a reporter)?

My experience is that I helped with a couple of panels at a convention, fielded tons of questions from everyone, and a couple of positive articles calling attention to local charity efforts were written.

BUT.

The photos used made me look like a donkey because I was laughing (I don't laugh pretty like some women do), Pam was not credited for my lekku (I mentioned FryGuy had made inexpensive lekku for his child by using tights and Plasti-Dip and apparently this was more interesting than "someone worked her butt off"), and I did not realize we had press at the panels. I also don't know if there's normally a procedure for this stuff and want to make sure I adhere to as much of it as I can when I let my base officers know.


Mon May 02, 2011 3:36 pm
Profile
Site Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Sat May 08, 2010 2:52 pm
Posts: 702
Location: Brentwood, NY USA (Long Island)
Unread post Re: News articles about your costumes - how do you...
Thanks, guys. I'll be better prepared next time. Despite my costume choices, I'm not used to being the center of attention, so a lot of this is new to me.

_________________
"Slow is smooth; smooth is fast" -- shi-fu's mantra for learning and executing combat. It seems to apply to all things in my life except sleep.


Mon May 02, 2011 4:45 pm
Profile WWW
User avatar

Joined: Sat May 08, 2010 6:36 am
Posts: 265
Location: Sydney Australia
Unread post Re: News articles about your costumes - how do you...
1 tip i will give having been in a few interviews. They always spell your name wrong !


Tue May 03, 2011 2:24 am
Profile
User avatar

Joined: Fri Nov 26, 2010 10:52 am
Posts: 167
Unread post Re: News articles about your costumes - how do you...
I've made it to the papers a few times. Both as a performer (theatre) and as a costumer. I've done sit down interviews and on the spot and the one thing right every time actually has been my name ;) Probably because it is not common and I have to spell it out every time ;)

They have all had errors in what I do or don't do and it really is easiest to just let it go by. It never looks good ;) Though I have made comment if it affects others. I run the Armageddon Cosplay comp and if that gets bad press I pursue things :)

In regards to photos, I generally find the established papers do make the effort of using good photos. They will take the time to get several and choose the best. And generally even in their online gallery the better photos go up.

I have had issues with some press before, but that was partly due to volunteers not saying "go away" when they should have (a camera crew got in to the judging of the cosplay comp and I was more than a little upset).

I am getting much better at saying "stop, I am not ready for a photo please wait until I put my gloves on/put my headdress back on (seriously.. Shaak Ti.. I was carrying the bloody things under my arm...)/ finish eating this icecream." If they want a good photo they will wait if not then they go away. There is such thing as bad press and I try and avoid it as much as possible.
Sadly the same can't be true of fan forums...

_________________
costume site | deviant art account | tumblr


Tue May 03, 2011 9:54 am
Profile WWW
User avatar

Joined: Sun Jun 06, 2010 7:29 pm
Posts: 291
Location: Northnern California
Unread post Re: News articles about your costumes - how do you...
my only contribution to this is in regards to making sure that you present the best opportunity for them to get a good photo. Some of this may seem like common sense but they are just my thoughts on how to be a good model (and I am a vain little thing)

Know your costume! know how it looks from every angle. practice poses and smiles and facial expressions in the mirror. No - we aren't professional models - but the same rules apply. If you know how to make yourself look good then it makes it much more likely that the photographer will get a good picture. If you are in a situation where there are hella cameras going off and you can't hold that same genuine smile for 5 minutes you will be happy that you practiced an attractive, easy to maintain facial expression. The same goes for poses - find a mirror and practice. Just because it seems correct or that it will look good in your head doesn't mean that it does. Ladies pay attention to your hands. I know it sounds silly but a clawed or awkwardly placed hand can ruin a picture.

As a personal trainer bad posture makes me crazy. I have clients that have worked so hard and look so good but as soon as I am done with them they relapse into their "no one is watching me" posture. You can look 10lbs lighter if you hold yourself correctly! The better your posture is in real life the better you will look in pictures (whether you were prepared or caught off guard). If you have good posture without thinking about it it makes it that much more likely that you won't be slouching in the photo. Just as with practicing poses - look at how you stand in costume. Find a couple of ways to shift your weight to stand comfortably and that look good and make yourself stand like that in everyday life (chances are - if it looks good then its good posture) If you are sitting at a booth - practice how you sit - find a way to sit comfortably and attractively.

Use those stomach muscles! Practice pulling in your belly button. When you are standing there having pictures taken - pull it in. I don't mean suck it in and hold your breath - I mean lightly pull your bellybutton back towards your spine. These muscles are an integral part of your posture and will help set off a reaction for you to put your head up, pull your shoulders down and stick out a hip!

If you want some simple, easy, no or small equipment exercises and stretches that you can do to improve your posture just PM me. If I get enough interest I'll even write up a little post for the fitness section.

_________________
Image


Wed May 04, 2011 6:13 am
Profile
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Reply to topic   [ 8 posts ] 

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
cron
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group.
Designed by ST Software.